CEDARDELL ARABIANS:
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THE KEY TO THE FUTURE
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by Faye Ahneman-Rudsenske
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ARABIAN HORSE TIMES
September/October 2002 • Vol. II
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The following article was written in 2002 and was published in the ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, September-October Issue, Vol. II. The reader should make allowances for the years that have passed since its publication.
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Recent newcomers may not recognize the name Cedardell Farms Arabian Stud at first, but for those who have been in the industry a long time the name evokes images of a wonderful, old breeding program. Names that come to mind include: Julep, Synbad, Super X, Hassan-Pasha, Imaraff, Garaff and Handeyraff to name a few. To understand the rich heritage and valuable legacy left by Cedardell, one must return to the late 1930s and the Kellog Sunday shows. Sponsored by the Kellogg Arabian Ranch in Pomona, Calif., the shows began in 1926, and became the catalyst that launched many Arabian horse dynasties. Warren and Emma Buckley of Plano, Illinois, were not immune to the appeal of the Arabian horses that they observed at the Kellogg Sunday shows. In 1937, after attending just such a show, they purchased the two yearling fillies Yatana (Farana x Ghazayat, by Rehali) and Il Id Ilkbir (Farana x Saba, by *Deyr), as well as the 4-year-old Hanad daughter Nadda (x *Rifda, by *Nureddin II) from the Kellogg Ranch. Unbeknownst to them, these three would form the nucleus of what was to become an extremely successful and world-renowned breeding operation — Cedardell Farms Arabian Stud.
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Yatana went on to produce 17 foals for the Buckleys while Il Id Ilkbir produced 11. Nadda produced only two foals, one by *Raseyn (bred by the Kellogg Institute) in 1938, and the Buckley's first foal, Abou (by *Fadl), who was bred by the Buckleys' oldest daughter Jannette, and born on May 5, 1939. Abou became an important part of the fledgling breeding program and sired 21 offspring for the Buckleys from 1944 through 1950.
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In the late 1930s, only 22 people owned Arabian horses in Illinois, but among those were the influential breeders Henry Babson, Albert W. Harris, and Philip K. Wrigley. The Buckleys took notice of their fellow Arabian breeders and, inspired by their knowledge and expertise, became serious students of the breed.
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From 1940 through 1944, with the exception of Sahra Su (by Indraff) who was born in 1946, 10 horses were registered in Warren Buckley's name. Starting with the birth of Safara (by Abou) in 1945 and through 1971, 274 more horses would be registered under the banner of Cedardell Farms Arabian Stud. From 1940 to 1950, Abou, the Babson-imported stallions *Sulejman (from Poland) and *Fadl (from Egypt), and the *Raffles sons Indraff (owned by Bazy Tankersley) and Tobruk (owned by Milton Thompson) were used in the Cedardell breeding program. (Although not bred by Cedardell, Tobruk sired Roseana [x Ahliyah], the 1959 U.S. National Champion English Pleasure Mare, while Indraff sired Tasliya [x Temag], the 1958 U.S. National Champion in both English and Western Pleasure.)
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In 1950, the Indraff son Hassan-Pasha (x Fa-Rahna, by *Fadl) was added to the mix. He continued to sire offspring for the Cedardell until his last registered foal in 1969. He also sired Hassa (x Caprice, by Gem of Cedardell), the 1964 U.S. National Champion in Western Pleasure.
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Records indicate that a filly by Selmage was born in January 1951, and, beginning in 1952, offspring by Imaraff and Bill Munson's Garaff began to appear among the Buckley herd. The uniformity of the *Raffles offspring did not go unnoticed and apparently the Buckleys liked the results so much they decided that bringing in more *Raffles blood was the best course of action. Two grandsons of *Raffles, Gem Of Cedardell (Geym x Imagida, by Image) and Tsali (Ibn Hanad x My Bonnie Nylon, by *Raffles) were brought in as well as Handeyraff (*Raffles x Hanadina, by Hanad). The latter two would reinforce the Davenport lines through Hanad and their earlier acquisition of Nadda. However, records again indicate that Gem of Cedardell only sired 17 get of which two were for Cedardell and one for the Buckley daughter Joann Shaw. Tsali fared slightly better with 13 offspring registered under Cedardell's name.
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In the mid-1950s, several momentous changes occurred that would catapult Cedardell to the top — trainers Red and Bobbie Beyer came to Cedardell in 1954, Julep (Gulastra x *Aziza) moved in "next door," in 1955 the first of the Cedardell's national champions was born, and Handeyraff became an integral part of their breeding program.


Habu
(Buna, by Ankar x
Haseyna, by Ferseyn)





Synbad
(Julep, by Gulastra x Sahra Su, by Indraff),
1958 U.S. National Champion Park Horse
and 1959 U.S. National Champion Stallion

High Fashion
(Julep, by Gulastra x
Sahra Su, by Indraff),
1964 U.S. National Champion Mare

Cedardell Aly
(Cedardel Heritage, by Synbad x
Juleppa, by Julep)

Lallegra
(Imaroff, by *Raffles x
Bint Abu, by Abou),
1959 U.S. National Champion Mare

Imarfa
(Imaraff, by *Raffles x
Marifa, by Abou),
1960 U.S. National Champion Mare and
1961 U.S. National Champion Park Horse

Sparkles
(Synbad, by Julep x
Silver Sparkle, by Imaraff)
1964 U.S. National Champion Park Horse
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Although the Arabian Horse Registry records say that Cedardell became the owners of Julep on June 30, 1939, different sources say otherwise. Bred by J.M. Dickinson of Travelers Rest in Franklin, Tenn., Julep was used very little as a sire. Other than two foals born in 1943 and 1944, it wasn't until 1954, when Illinois breeders Dr. and Mrs. Robert LaRue brought him to their farm, that he got a chance to breed more mares. The Buckleys' daughter Joann Shaw made the fortuitous decision to breed the "old" newcomer and, in 1955, Synbad was born. Cedardell would breed to Julep 24 more times during the ensuing years with the last Cedardell-bred foal by Julep born in 1964. It should also be noted that early, influential breeders of the day, Albert Harris and Dr. Bill Munson, who had initially inspired the Buckleys, also bred to Julep.
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Handeyraff eventually sired 39 foals for Cedardell out of a lifetime total of 264 registered get. From the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s, Handeyraff, Julep and Synbad were major sires although others like Habu, Super X and Cedardell Heritage joined the roster in the mid-1960s. As the son of national champions Synbad and Lallegra, Cedardell Heritage was considered by Joann to be the "linchpin to future breeding success," and he certainly does figure prominently in future generations.
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Occasionally, the Buckleys bred their mares to non-owned Cedardell stallions, albeit of the same lineage. In 1968, Khemosabi's sire, Amerigo, and Al-Marah Dandy were used as well as Camiraff in 1970.
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It was master horseman Red Beyers, however, who put it all together. In 1958, at the first ever U.S. National Championship Show, which was held in Estes Park, Colo., two Cedardell owned and bred horses went Top Ten — the stallion Haj-Amin and the mare Lallegra. However, it was Synbad who would claim the 1958 U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallion title at the age of 3, as well as the National Championship in Park! Synbad would go on to sire 321 foals in his lifetime with his last foal born in 1979.
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With Beyers at the helm, there was no stopping Cedardell. In 1959, Synbad and Lallegra returned to claim the U.S. National Championships in Stallion and Mare Halter, respectively, and Haj-Amin was the park horse champion. Cedardell would go on to prove that their breeding program was no fluke, and it was not uncommon in the upcoming years to have Cedardell horses win national championships in both halter and performance.


Hassan-Pasha
(Indraff, by *Raffles x Fa-Rahna, by *Fadl)
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Super X
(Synbad, by Julep x Lallegra, by Imaroff)
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Cedardell Cinco
(Cedardell Heritage, by Synbad x
Bint Yatana, by Haf-Amin)
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Buna
(Ankar, by Antez x
Panay, by *Nasr)
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Cedardell Crystal
(Habu, by Buna x
Silver Starlight, by Hassan-Pasha)

LL La Embra
(Lamolin, by *Barich De Washoe x
TC Jaajiah, by The Judge)
1991 U.S. National Cutting Futurity Champion
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The 1960s would bring even more acclaim to the farm. Imarfa (Imaraff x Marifa, by Abou) was the 1960 National Champion Mare, and Sabra Bint Sabba (Hassan-Pasha x Sahra Bint, by Abou) was Top Ten in halter and the National Champion in Park. In 1961, Imarfa was the U.S. National Park Champion and, in 1962, another Imaraff son, Count Imaraff (x Bint Abu, by Abou) was the U.S. National Champion in Western Pleasure. The year of 1963 netted Hajababa (Haj-Amin x Ababa, by Abou) the national champion stallion crown, and 1964 brought two more national championships, one in halter to High Fashion, a full sister to Synbad, and one to Sparkles (Synbad x Silver Sparkle) in Park.
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In 1966, the Buckleys decided to hang it up, and the decision was made to pass on the torch. They bred a lifetime total of 284 purebred Arabians (the last foal registered under the Cedardell Farms Arabian Stud was in 1971). Like many others who gave their blood, sweat and tears to develop and maintain a breeding program, there seemed to be no one to carry it on with the same devotion and care that the Buckleys had poured into their life's work. Or was there?


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Enter one Margaret (then Knight) Bergtold, certainly a savior for the Cedardell breeding program as well as the Arabian breed. An ardent admirer of the Buckley breeding program and Hassan-Pasha in particular, Margaret had earlier purchased several fillies from the Buckleys. She was anxious and eager to carry on the Cedardell name and legacy.
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"When other breeders started breeding for more Saddlebred-looking animals, I thought, no, I'm not going along with that," Margaret relates. "If I do, then there will be nothing. There were some wonderful foundation mares that carried on through the years from three or four families like some of the Kellogg people and Frances Eblen's husband, who was one of the biggest importers in the 1930s and 1940s."
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Margaret had all of the right qualifications. Born and raised in Michigan, she was one of four siblings and as a second generation horsewoman (her father had trotters and pacers), she literally grew up with horses, both on their back and in the racing sulkies.
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"My sister and I helped my father train trotters and pacers for years," she reveals. Although she never did any actual racing, she admits that whenever she could possibly hide it from her mother, she had the privilege and thrill of warming up the horses before each race.
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Like many girls, Margaret and her sister were animal lovers, and once she was introduced to the Arabian horse, it was a natural migration. "Of course, while growing up, you want a pretty horse to ride," she says unabashedly. "If you look at a Standardbred horse, they're pretty in flight, but they're not so pretty standing still."
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Margaret Bergtold with four outstanding offspring out of the Cedardell-bred mare Cedardell Crystal (Habu x Silver Starlight, by Hassan-Pasha). Two of the mares are by Cedardell and two are by Cedardell Heritage, and both of these stallions contributed greatly to continuing the Cedardell breeding program and legacy. Standing, from left to right, are: Cedardell Venus (by Cedardell), Cedardell Finest (by Cedardell Heritage), Margaret Bergtold, Cedardell Lalique (by Cedardell Heritage), and Cedardell Coleen (by Cedardell).
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The first Arabians purchased by the Arbury family came from Ben Hur Farms in Portland, Ind. Owned by Herbert and Blanche Tormohlen, Margaret notes that their breeding program was similar in some respects to the Cedardell program."Tormohlen had wonderful, usually chestnut, horses," she says. "They were lovely with the original, beautiful sculptured head and body with one less vertebra.
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"Of course, Mr. Buckley and Mr. Tormohlen used to spend a lot of time together on the phone arguing about how they thought they should breed their horses," she chuckles. "Ben Hur Farms and then Cedardell were probably the two places in which I saw such symmetry," she adds soberly. "Both bred for a common goal and both achieved uniformity in their breeding programs. At that time, Tormohlen was up in years and when he died, the horses were dispersed everywhere, and no one knew where they went.
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"I didn't want to see Cedardell dispersed like Ben Hur Farms, and I was determined that it wouldn't happen. The Buckleys' daughter Joann [Buckley-Shaw] tried to hold it together for a few years, but she had too many other irons in the fire. I had purchased four head from her in the early 1960s and, in 1966, I bought the entire herd, which included Julep."
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Julep, however, was in such bad shape that he was euthanized albeit with great reluctance, while the remaining 32 Cedardell horses were relocated to her farm in Michigan.
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"I had to chuckle," Margaret remembers. "One time Red Beyers said 'I don't know why they ever named it Cedardell Arabian Stud when all these mares are doing all the work.' Hence the name was changed to Cedardell Arabian Farms of Michigan."
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Cedardell Trainer Sterling White with Jim Bergtold

Cedardell Trainers (as well as father and son)
Jose Valdez Sr. (PaPa) and Jose Valdez Jr.
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Although Red was "retired" and had moved to Mt. Vernon, Mo., he expressed a desire "to come back to the girls" and, in 1976, at his urging, Margaret purchased 2,000 acres near Goodman, MO. Moving the horses to a more suitable year-around habitat made sense. "We simply can't provide housing for the amount of animals that we have, and I never had any luck with housing in Michigan anyway," Margaret acknowledges. "They just get somebody pinned in the corner and beat them up."
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The limestone countryside of southern Missouri was ideal with its rock ledges and formations that provided natural shelter. "They can get in out of the wind and, of course, there are underground springs all over the farm so we only need waterers mainly around the barnyard," Margaret informs. "In the big pastures, they have ample access to a water stream."
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With the main staples of hay and grain in the winter, pelleted feed for the older animals and lush green pastures in the summer, the horses thrive and flourish in this natural environment. The mares roam freely in separate pastures while the stallions are individually stalled with a daily rotation turnout in large paddocks. In breeding season, the stallions visit selected mares and are hand bred.
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"Red directed us toward Missouri because he and Bobbie were living in Mt. Vernon and liked the milder climate," Margaret continues. "Although Illinois and Michigan are cold, I love it, and the dormancy of the colder climates helps with bugs and diseases, but Red told us Missouri still gets frost, which slows up the insect cycle and diseases. So we came down here, looked, made the 'mistake' of buying land, and we've been here ever since. We still have our Michigan farm where we grow apple trees and sell hay. My son, Tony, maintains it for me," she confides.
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The Beyers were back in their element amongst the Cedardell horses that they loved so much. Actually they [Red and Bobbie] worked for me longer than they did the original Buckley family," Margaret adds. "They were with us about 14 years. Red was not only a great trainer, but he had horse sense. He was the only person I ever knew who could walk out in a field with the babies and mamas, and the babies would leave their mamas to pester him. He didn't feed them snacks either. When he left the field, those babies followed him right up to the gate. In bad bug season, the mares would back up to him, and he'd scratch them. It was fun to watch. I sometimes wonder if people who like horses produce a certain scent that the horses recognize."
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The workload looks staggering, yet, thanks to Margaret, a hands-on owner, it generally runs like a well-oiled machine with the help of six to eight employees who work on a rotation basis along with Margaret's daughter, Abigail, her husband, Kenneth Anderson, and trainer Sterling White.
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Margaret makes the breeding decisions each year and, along with her husband, Jim, supervises the entire operation. "We don't have `managers;' we went through enough of that," Margaret says candidly."The only 'managers' around here anymore are Jim and Margaret. Our employees are their own manager and if they aren't honorable enough to do their job and follow instructions, they bear the consequences. We've tried a manager at different times, and it just didn't work. You have to have your thumb right on the hub yourself, especially when you're working with live animals."
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As the driving force behind Cedardell, Margaret's focus, determination and enthusiasm has not diminished. "A lot of my contributions have been on paper the last few years because somebody needs to earn a living to pay for the help and feeding these animals," she notes. "We're busy trying to make a living so that limits us, but we're there. Jim, my husband, likes the horses — the mechanical horses," she amends. "If it hadn't been for him, we wouldn't have survived the first 10 years since we didn't have any mechanical help, and he had to fix everything that fell apart. He kept things going so we could continue to exist," she credits.
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Missouri didn't get its name "The Show Me State" for nothing, and Margaret was suddenly faced with a new challenge. During the Michigan years, the Cedardell horses had been shown extensively in halter and, according to Margaret, they did very well. That all changed, however, when they moved to Missouri.
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"People said, 'Okay, we know they're halter horses, but what else can they do? Can you ride them? So we tried a little bit of everything. Abby, my daughter, was a teenager then, so we put her in the saddle and started from scratch. We did the best we could with the help we could get at the time."
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Although the Bergtolds currently show on a modest level, they still basically consider themselves a breeding farm and have no immediate plans to expand. "I don't think we can [expand]," Margaret says. "We try to hit a few Class A shows to get our horses exposed and qualified. Then you have to stay home and tend to your knittin' as far as your breeding program. Although you may not want to be farmers, you have to farm to a certain degree in order to harvest your food supply to maintain these animals and the pastures."
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Although the predominantly Crabbet-bred, Cedardell herd numbers over 200, only six or seven stallions are used in the breeding program. "Occasionally we breed a young stallion, but we don't want to confuse his mind if he's in training," Margaret points out. "I don't try for volumes and sometimes we go years with only three or four foals born each year.
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"You get stallion poor on a breeding farm," she chuckles. "Of course you can always castrate them, but once that's done, there's no going back. Usually I have fields of stallions before I geld and everybody says I'm crazy, but it works out in the end.
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"Sometimes we suddenly realize that some of our mares are getting up in age, and we better breed them to find out what they can produce. Some of the old mares end up being the best producers, and you wonder why you wasted all those years. We bred a bunch this year and, while I don't know the exact count or what's absolutely settled, it's about 15."
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Margaret's views on breeding have changed very little and if anything her philosophy has become even more firmly entrenched. She, like her predecessors the Buckleys, has also chosen to stay within her own tight-knit breeding program and has introduced very little outside blood.

Cedardell
(Cedardell Cinco, by Cedardel Heritage x
Rose Of Synbad, by Synbad)
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Cedardel Redbaron
(Super X, by Synbad x
Cedardell Pride, by Habu)
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Case of Cedardell
(Cedardell Case, by Ibn Bint Yatana x
Satin Madonna, by Iszi)
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Cedardell Dowcase
(Cedardell Case, by Ibn Bint Yatana x
Cedardell Dow, by Cedardell Dandy)
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Cederdel Soldier
(Super X, by Synbad x
Princess Irene, by Julep)
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Cedardell Ibnchina
(Ibn Bint Yatana, by Super X x
Cedardel Chinadol, by Cedardell Aly)


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Cederdell Sasha (Cedardell Case, by Ibn Bint Yatana
x Cedardell Natasha, by Bunarr) has been in the show cutting pen since 1996 and has been tested on the regional, national, and Scottsdale level. He will return fresh from last year's Reserve Championship in the Cutting Novice Horse 5K Limit and a Top Ten in open cutting in Albuquerque to compete in Louisville.
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Cedardell Derek (Cedardel Virtuoso, by Islim x Cedarell Theory, by Cedardelsonofagun) a tested and proven reiner, will be competing in the reining division at this year's (2002) U.S. Nationals.
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Cederdell Gowan (Islim, by Islam x Cedardell Aroise, by Cedardel Heritage), who returned to the show ring in 2000 after an eight-year hiatus, will also be competing in the reining division at the 2002 U.S. Nationals.

Cedardel Expresso
(Cedardel Virtuoso, by Islim x
Cedardell Proper, by Cedardell Aly)
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Cedardel Islimdow
(Islim, by Islam x
Cedardell Dow, by Cedardell Dandy)
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Cedardel Virtuoso
(Islim, by Islam x
Cedardell Arioso, by Cedardell Aly)
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"I think we've lost a lot of the good, old sound breeding,” she adds sadly. "I didn't want that to happen so I basically stopped showing in halter. I don't want Saddlebreds; I want an Arabian. I've watched too many other breeds lose their look. I love a good working Quarter Horse. I love a good old Morgan type, but you rarely ever see them. I don't know about other people, but the way I look at it is, why do they always want to change them? They were meant for a certain reason. So is the Arabian."
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That common thread of perpetuating the wonderful old blood is providing rare and unique opportunities for other breeders to re-introduce many of the characteristics that are missing in the breed today. Her breeding philosophy isn't so very different than most modern-day breeders as she strives for pretty, typey and athletic horses that can do something, but, in her case, she has actually accomplished it with generations of correct horses to back it.
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She, like a few others, has used line breeding to accomplish those goals, but in order to do that, the horses must carry the right genes and be prepotent in passing on the highly inheritable characteristics while minimizing the less desirable ones. Her success in that endeavor has certainly proven the strength of her program.
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"Line breeding isn't really as nasty as it sounds," she smiles. "I have on occasion used a few outcrosses and through their offspring we have introduced some new blood. However, I still follow the original farm's breeding program. They always had awesome horses by which I mean athletic horses and that's what I want to continue. I don't want a horse that's going to fall apart. I want strong, willing, happy individuals, and they're happy only if they're comfortable, and they're only comfortable if they're straight legged and have strong bodies. I love pretty heads, but I'm not going to breed for a pretty head. You can't ride a head. You can always have pretty heads hanging over the stall doors, but leave them in there; usually the remainder doesn't match. I don't know of an ugly head on my farm. There may be some that are a little plain, but overall we've got pretty decent, feminine faces and very masculine heads on the stallions."
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Over the years, Margaret has occasionally ventured a little outside of her bloodlines and has used the *Bask grandson Baska Rajah (Na Nazeid x Bridge Tajya, by Taj Mahal) who is owned by Joe Staheli. However, even then she strayed very little since Baska Raja traces to Ferseyn on his maternal side.
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Margaret has also used the Egyptian-bred Serenity Menkaure (*Khofo x *Serenity Montaha, by Galal) whom she purchased in 1972, and the line-bred Indraff grandson, AM Sea Captain, who is closely related to her beloved Hassan-Pasha.
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"I bought Hassan-Pasha when he was 23, and he died when he was 27,” she explains. "I only got a few foals by him so that's why I went to Sea Captain with two of my mares when Joe Staheli introduced me to him. That was the reason for that cross, and it still isn't really out of the family. I also bred one mare that I bought from Staheli, and she stayed with him in Arizona, so he returned her to Sea Captain every year.

"I haven't bought too many outcross stallions and those that I have are usually pretty much only a generation off. I have purchased approximately 12 outcross mares over the years. Of those, probably 10 were quite sensational in their contribution to the program. I prefer to buy my outcross breeding in the female form and raise a foal on what you want to outcross on your line breeding. That's my theory and that's all we've done for 36 years."
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As one peruses the list of stallions that Margaret has utilized over the years, the strength of the Cedardell program is readily apparent. One of Margaret's foundation stallions was the beautiful bay Cedardell Cinco (Cedardell Heritage x Bint Yatana, by Haj-Amin) and his son Cedardell (x Rose of Synbad, by Synbad). Islim, the Islam son out of an Islam daughter, brought back a strong Gulastra line, while his sons Cedardel Virtuoso (x Cedardell Arioso, by Hassan-Pasha) and Cedardel Islimdow (x Cedardell Dow, by Cedardell Dandy) reinforced it. All of the old Cedardell-bred horses that the Buckleys either bred or used in their breeding program are found close up in the pedigrees — Lallegra, Super X, Habu, Sahra Su, Gem Of Cedardell, Imaraff, Yatana, Haj-Amin, Julep, Synbad, Handeyraff, Abou, and even Garaff through Julcons King Tut. Bunarr (Buna x Miss Prim, by Ferneyn), who was bred by Frances Eblen and purchased by Margaret in 1972, has also propagated the line.
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The three mares that the original Cedardell farm purchased as their foundation, figure prominently, especially Yatana. She has 168 grandget to her credit and is found in many of the present-day Cedardell pedigrees. Considering that Nadda only bore one offspring for Cedardell and one for the Kellogg Arabian Ranch, her second generation numbers 38, an impressive number, while Il Id Ilkbir, who had 11 get for Cedardell has 47 grandget.
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Over the years, the farm has also produced a multitude of colors including chestnuts, greys, bays, roans and liver chestnuts with a sprinkling of blacks. Before his untimely death in 1984, the black Cedardell Actor, produced three blacks for the farm.
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"The black came out of the Super X side of the family as well as the Yatana line," Margaret theorizes. "She's been gone 10 years now, and although she was bay, I think she produced every color an Arabian can be. She was nicknamed Old Saucepan because they had to feed her out of a saucepan when her mother didn't have any milk," Margaret reminisces. "She was probably the best producer the old farm had, and she came with the herd when I bought them. I had her 10 years. She was a lovely mare.”
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Margaret admits to having a special fondness for the old horses. "I like old people because I'm one of them,” she jokes. "When I got Hassan-Pasha, he was 23 years old, and they told me that he hated water and didn't advise riding him. Of course, I didn't listen. I stuck a binder twine in his mouth, shinnied up his front leg, got on his back and we went galloping down into the Chippewa River, which my house sits right on it. It reminded me of the swim hole my father had pushed up with a bulldozer years ago. Of course Pasha dove in headfirst with his whole body. Then he got up, shook and looked around trying to find me. We were great friends until he died of old age," she says softly. "I have a lot of compassion for these old horses because they're the ones with brains. They're done with the 'nonsense' and only do what they can handle.”
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Looking at the pedigrees of Margaret's herd, one is simply in awe of her commitment in producing such outstanding quality. Her vow to perpetuate the Cedardell line has certainly been kept, and she has done it very consistently and very successfully.
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"I live with these animals from day to day and have for the last 40 years,” she says. "I just tried to keep the original bloodlines together as well as better them. You always try to improve and avoid mistakes."
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A product of their heritage and environment, the Cedardell horses are known for having tough feet and legs and good minds. "All of the Cedardell horses have done well over the years,” she contends. "They've been consistent. We're either not looked at all in the show ring, or we're right near the top."
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Like their counterparts of yesteryear, the Cedardell horses are proving to be tough competition in a variety of disciplines. It's important to remember that these horses are known for their longevity, not only in producing, but also in competition.
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Year after year, the Cedardell horses have proven their soundness by returning to the show ring. Take LL La Embra for example. She has amassed an envious record as a cutting horse on both the regional and national level from 1991 through 2000. She not only won the 1991 U.S. National Arabian Cutting Futurity Championship, but has also won several national top tens and reserve championships over the years — a true testimony to the strength of the Cedardell horses.
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The beautiful Cedardell Corona has been an extremely successful reining horse in Regions VII and VIII, as has Cedardel Bacarach in Regions I, VII and IX, while Cedardell Lexcin, also a reining and cutting mare, has competed successfully on a regional level for seven years.
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Herd sire Cedardell Redbaron is another regional cutting horse champion as is the outcross mare Oasis Success.
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The "buck" doesn't stop there. Oasis Joy is a regional winner in Country English Pleasure. Cedardell Proper also happens to show in Pleasure Driving along with Cedardell Total and Cedardell Mark. Let's not forget Cedardell Arries, a regional winner in western pleasure as well as Margaret's stallions Cedardell and Cedardell Tnasious.
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The Cedardell breeding program has also produced some hunter horses and, since Cedardell VIZ and Cedardell Zack have already demonstrated that hunter pleasure is another division in which the Cedardell horse will excel, daughter Abby plans to show some hunter horses next spring.
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Just to round everything out, Cedardell has dipped a toe into the halter waters with the mare Charmof Cederdell and Case of Cedardell, an Estes Park Breeding Stallion Champion.
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However, it's quite apparent that Margaret prefers her cutting and reining horses. "We're breeders more than showmen, which is one of the reasons I sent some horses to Joe Staheli in Arizona for cutting in 1986. I wanted to see how they would do. Cutting is a hard working, very intelligent class and rough and tough on an animal. They have to be very athletic to survive plus they have to think. Once you drop the reins, those horses are on their own. I've had six or seven cutters and reiners with Joe since 1986, and he'll be out there this year unless something happens."
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Her horses have proven to be no slouches, which only reinforces her assessment and expectations of the Cedardell lineage. This year, three Cedardell horses will make their way to Louisville and the U.S. National Championship Show. Cedardell Sasha, who has been in the show cutting pen since 1996 and has been tested on the regional, national and Scottsdale level, returns fresh from last year's Reserve Championship in the Cutting Novice Horse 5K Limit and a Top Ten in open cutting in Albuquerque. Two other reining horses, Cedardell Derek, a tested and proven reiner, and the bay stallion Cedardell Gowan, who returned to the show ring in 2000 after an eight-year hiatus, will also be competing in the reining division.
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"Gowan's mother was dying of strangles when he was about 3 months old so he got the name Cedardell Gowan (Cedardell Go On)," informs Margaret. His prophetic name will certainly carry Cedardell to new heights.
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So what does the future hold for Cedardell? "The economy is tight," Margaret affirms with a sigh." Continuing to run a farm takes more than most people can afford. You take what comes on a daily basis and hope things improve, but our world situation is scary right now. Each year you wonder if you should give it up, but you don't; something keeps you going year after year."
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Margaret is basically the only one left in her family who owns horses on such a large scale. At one point in time, her brother Robin Arbury owned Saddlebreds, and his daughter Leslie Arbury-Bennett did a considerable amount of showing. Her sister has a couple of "pets" and, with eight grandchildren of her own, four in Michigan (Tony's) and four in Missouri (Abby's), Margaret is hopeful that perhaps some of the grandchildren will carry on the tradition." I think Abby's girls are interested and maybe the younger boy, Ty," she says hopefully.
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Fads and trends come and go, and it isn't often that one can return to the source of greatness. If not for Margaret, the Cedardell breeding program would have been lost. She stood firm and steadfast in her beliefs and, today, Margaret Bergtold of Cedardell Arabians has handed a gift to the breeders of today — a gift from the past. Now they just need to grasp it with both hands and hold on tight for it is the past that holds the key to the future.
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Rt. 1 Box 154 • Goodman, Missouri 64843 • 417-364-8365
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